Savvy Ways To Generate Extra Cash | ISIC New Zealand

Money is hard for students, and it’s completely understandable that many are searching for a secondary source of income. There are lots of opportunities out there, ranging from selling your hobby skills, to working online, to flexible secondary work. Read on to explore some savvy ways to generate extra cash.

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Having to be careful with your finances is part and parcel of the student experience, and it could be suggested that it’s an important part of becoming an adult. However, there are levels to this, and with Stuff reporting that a third of New Zealand students go without food and sanitary products due to a lack of funds, there is clearly a gap to be made up. For many students, this will be a side hustle, and the good news is that there has never been an easier time to make a little bit of extra cash.

Turning a hobby into a vocation

Many students will have hobbies that can be turned into an extra source of income. For those without one, it might be a good idea to start; psychological studies have shown that hobbies improve time-keeping, promote working flow and help to provide a stress coping mechanism, all important parts of being a student. On the side, they can make a lot of money. Take photography, for instance. Most camera phones give instant access to the hobby, and modern models are often as good as their bespoke brand alternatives. The processing equipment available on the likes of Instagram makes editing a breeze, and quick, too. What this means is that anybody can create professional photographs and sell them, or, alternatively, create a social media account with a buzz that attracts money from companies seeking out influencers. A great 'in' for this market is through food - there's a huge amount of marketing and social content based on Instagram through food, and people are always looking for new photographers. Furthermore, restaurants are always looking for help with creating new content for their social media and websites, creating a great market for pros. Whether that's restaurants, individuals or even your own work, you can make good money from taking pictures of food on order, or for sale to influencers.

Harnessing the internet

The internet is a wonderful money-making tool. There are countless options available on the web to help you make money in your downtime, and, as the Herald report, some survey websites will pay out NZ$150 for only brief pieces of work. Surveys are the most well known and common money-making opportunity, but there are plenty of other methods, too. These include advertising on your personal websites, joining market research groups and affiliate marketing.

Second jobs

As a student, you ideally want your second job to be as easy on time as it can be. Studying is hard, and is, of course, the main reason you’re at university or college – you need to spend as much time as possible between coursework and books. Today, there are a multitude of secondary roles that offer flexibility in addition to decent pay.

The most well known varieties of these jobs are gig economy work, for instance Uber, Deliveroo and other quasi-courier services. These allow you to work as much or as little as you like. More creatively, there are medical trials to get involved with and if you have a vehicle, car-sharing. The internet has made it easier for people to connect and share what services they need, and this, in turn, can benefit your side job.

Money is hard for students, and it’s completely understandable that many are searching for a secondary source of income. There are lots of opportunities out there, ranging from selling your hobby skills, to working online, to flexible secondary work. Whatever you choose, always remember to balance your time wisely.

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Student life
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cash , hack , life , money , student , student life , tips , university life
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Author: Jennifer Dawson

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